PIPA In the News

Mon
23 Jul
2018

CoreLogic's Kylie Davis appointed to PIPA Board

The Property Investment Professionals of Australia (PIPA) have elected two new board directors including CoreLogic's head of content Kylie Davis as its membership base has been growing.

ASPIRE Advisor Network's Richard Crabb has also been appointed to the PIPA board recently.

Ms Davis is a 25-year media veteran and has nearly 10 years' experience in property, as national network editor at News Corp Australia and four years in solutions and real estate marketing roles at CoreLogic.

The PIPA chairman Peter Koulizos said PIPA is delighted with Ms Davis's appointment given her strong media background and expertise in property "both professionally and personally."

The Sydney-based Davis said she looked forward to working with the rest of the board to raise awareness of professional standards in property investing.

Wed
11 Jul
2018

How investors recognise gentrification in embryo

Despite the views of some people, all property will not always increase in value, so we all have to work a little harder to ensure that our investment selections add up, especially during these slightly more turbulent times.

Searching for the next up-and-coming suburbs and regional centres can be a risky exercise, but it has the potential to pay dividends.

It requires a certain amount of crystal ball-gazing and a level of courage, but if you get it right, the rewards can be well worth the effort.

Spotting gentrification requires analysing data for tell-tale signs of imminent changes, as well as visiting the location to reinforce the data and determining which pockets, streets and properties in the location are the best quality.

It also requires investors to have the financial capability, conviction and courage to purchase in a location that may not quite be on the map yet.

Tue
10 Jul
2018

Data helps property investors identify gentrification before it happens

Despite the views of some people, all property will not always increase in value, so we all have to work a little harder to ensure that our investment selections add up, especially during these slightly more turbulent times.

Searching for the next up-and-coming suburbs and regional centres can be a risky exercise, but it has the potential to pay dividends.

It requires a certain amount of crystal ball-gazing and a level of courage, but if you get it right, the rewards can be well worth the effort.

Spotting gentrification requires analysing data for tell-tale signs of imminent changes, as well as visiting the location to reinforce the data and determining which pockets, streets and properties in the location are the best quality.

It also requires investors to have the financial capability, conviction and courage to purchase in a location that may not quite be on the map yet.

Wed
04 Jul
2018

Follow DINKs to find next hot spot

Find a suburb that has a higher than average number of couples without children, with the female in a professional role, and long-term residents, and you may be onto a winner.

New research released by the Property Investment Professionals of Australia (PIPA) looked for similar signs that could help homebuyers and investors pick the next suburbs to gentrify.

"If you had this knowledge a few decades ago, you would have bought in suburbs such as Balmain and Paddington in Sydney before they become hightly sought-after and expensive," PIPA chairman Peter Koulizos said.

"Likewise, in Melbourne, where you would have invested in Richmond or Collingwood before they became really popular and pricey."

Wed
04 Jul
2018

Property market update: Sydney, June 2018

Tighter financing conditions and less investment activity continue to weaken the housing market conditions in Sydney and other capital cities. Can investors still find opportunities in NSW's capital?

Over the quarter, overall dwelling values in Sydney decline by 0.3 of a percentage point. A huge part of the decline seen in the capital city was driven by premium suburbs, which dropped in value by 7.3 per cent.

As in the case of the past months, the comparatively smaller markets of Brisbane, Adelaide and Hobart did better than the "premium markets" of Sydney and Melbourne, experiencing a rise in dwelling values at 0.2 to 0.3 of a percentage point.

According to CoreLogic, the recent declines in two of the biggest property markets in Australia is deemed "the most substantial decline in housing demand".

Tue
03 Jul
2018

Property market update: Melbourne, June 2018

The slipping homes values in the "premium markets" of Melbourne and Sydney have resulted in the "most substantial decline in housing demand' in Australia. Is it still worth investing in Victoria's capital?

After experiencing strong gains from 2012 to 2013 and benefiting from high investor demand, the house price growth in Melbourne is on track to recording a negative number this year as tightening credit conditions weaken investment activity.

Melbourne saw the third biggest fall in dwelling values this quarter at 0.4 of a percentage point, preceded only by Darwin and Perth, which are down by 1.1 per cent and 0.5 of a percentage point, respectively.

The more expensive properties in the capital city saw a bigger decline than the affordable properties. Dwellings at the more affordable price points are generally being supported by first home buyers.

Mon
02 Jul
2018

Property market update: Brisbane, June 2018

While other capital cities saw home values decline consistently in the past months, Brisbane stood strong and displayed admirable resilience — "buoyed by steady population growth driving demand and underpinned by good economic fundamentals". How can investors maximise opportunities in Queensland's capital?

Home values nationwide declined by 0.2 of a percentage point in June and are down by 0.8 of a percentage point over the past year due to tighter finance conditions and less investment activity, according to the latest CoreLogic Home Value Index.

Despite the national decline, Brisbane came out as a winner with 0.2 of a percentage point increase, preceded only by Adelaide and Hobart, which saw 0.3 of a percentage point increase.

Like in most capital cities, long-term values at the more affordable end of the city's housing market increased faster than the more expensive properties.

Mon
02 Jul
2018

Shock at number of investors getting poor advice

A new ASIC report has found that a shocking number of SMSF property investors are subject to bad advice that could leave them "significantly" worse off in retirement.

The reports Improving the quality of advice and member experiences and Member experiences with self-managed superannuation funds saw ASIC select 250 client files at random. Out of this selection, 91 per cent did not align with the Corporations Act's "best interests" duty and related obligations. This included poor record-keeping and process failures in 10 per cent of the files. An additional 10 per cent would have been "significantly worse off" when retiring due to the given advice.

ASIC deputy chair Peter Kell said that making decisions about super is one of the most important decisions a person can make, but there is little knowledge about them.

"ASIC found there is a lack of basic knowledge of the legal obligations in setting up or running an SMSF."

Sat
23 Jun
2018

These suburbs could be the next big thing

Looking to invest in the next Balmain or Collingwood? A property investment expert has revealed suburbs around Australia that are set to gentrify.

Research by Peter Koulizos, the chairman of Property Investment Professionals of Australia (PIPA), has identified 12 suburbs in four states:

Sat
23 Jun
2018

The gentrification process

New research released by the Property Investment Professionals of Australia (PIPA) has revealed the next city suburbs set to gentrify.

Peter Koulizos talks about the gentrification process.

 

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